Leadership

The Cost of Turnover

Published on Jan 12th, 2012 by

The Cost of Turnover

With specialist profiles the cost of turnover is almost always vastly underestimated. Keeping the good people on board and motivated is really important.

I’ve had projects where the main player in my project quit, got transferred or even was fired right under my nose without me being consulted. All situations caused irrecoverable damage, just by neglecting the value of that one person. Things like this happen, you’ll find a solution but the shininess of your project will be a distant memory.

Look at this type of situations as a risk, it’s what’s often called the truck number, or more respectfully, the lottery number for a certain key role in a project. The lower the number, the higher the risk. Should anyone in that key role get run over by a truck or win the lottery, they’d be gone and the project would be stuck in a rut.

Should you be dealing with this kind of risk, look into Brook’s law which says that adding people to a late project makes it only later, the same goes for finding replacements and the resulting team dynamics are the same.

Some time ago I wrote an article on project manager switching, which often is a project’s death sentence (or at least a budget death sentence) if not done properly: Neglected Truths in a Project Hand Over.

I found this great list of the cost that a lost employee will bring along:

  • Time for your existing employees to cover work in the interim
  • Time to to find a replacement
  • Money  to find a replacement
  • Money to train the replacement
  • Loss of knowlegde (imho the most overlooked cost in IT)
  • Stress and strain on an existing team

Here’s the infographic from mindflash.com with other great clues, showing the signs your rockstar employee might be looking for a new job,  nicely presented stuff, have a look …

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Scanning your PM Landscape

Published on Mar 4th, 2011 by

Scanning your PM Landscape
Working as a PM you’re often confronted with new companies, new management and new people to manage.

To get up to speed comfortably as a PM in a new environment it’s essential to get to know the people you’re working with.

I like doing interviews with people when I arrive in a new company. Just talks where I try to ask the right questions. I’ve done this in several companies now and it’s surprising to see how much you can learn in early stages. The interviews are casual but planned and I take my time to prepare them. I try to do them as soon as possible.

I’ve kept a log of questions that offered interesting answers and want to share them with you, they’re in random order.

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Silence is Golden

Published on Oct 1st, 2010 by

Silence is Golden
In my observations of successful leaders I noticed that they never, ever gave offence to anyone. They where charismatic and tactful. This is very important to get results from people. Most of the time this means thinking before you react.
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